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Columbia-Richland Fire Department Named a 2019 Fire Safe South Carolina Community

CRFD recently received the exciting news that is being recognized as one of 57 Fire Safe communities in the state of South Carolina for the year 2019.

This comes following another year where the department invested efforts in Community Risk Reduction (CRR) programs focused on reducing the risk of fires and other emergencies in area neighborhoods. These programs included fire safety education presentations and free smoke alarms installations for residents in need.

“I continue to be GREATLY impressed with the work of our staff each and every day not only putting out fires but taking steps to prevent them,” said Columbia-Richland Fire Chief Aubrey D. Jenkins, “This recognition by Fire Safe South Carolina is a true affirmation of the passion our members have for keeping citizens safe. I join in congratulating the staff at our department and the other fire departments recognized on a job well done.”

Fire Safe South Carolina (FSSC) has actively worked with local fire departments to develop community risk reduction (CRR) plans for their jurisdictions since its launch in June 2017. With the help of local fire departments FSSC has worked to reduce fire-related injuries, promote consistent messaging, improve data quality, and provide valuable resources.

“Outreach has been tremendous,” State Fire’s CRR Chief Josh Fulbright said. “Departments reported more than 1,500 CRR events, educating more than 250,000 citizens. We congratulate designees, to whom alarm resources are available, and are providing each a custom Fire Safe SC Community sign denoting their success.”

Fire Safe SC’s organizational partners include the S.C. State Firefighters’ Association, the S.C. State Association of Fire Chiefs, and the S.C. Fire Marshal Association. 

As part of its work in community risk reduction, over the course of 2019 CRFD conducted 71 fire education presentations, hosted 42 tours of fire stations and installed more than 1,200 free smoke alarms for area residents. These activities and more reached well over 14,000 people.